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Marie Angélique Duval: Planisphere, ou Carte Generale du Monde

Map: WLD4522
 
Cartographer: Marie Angélique Duval
Title: Planisphere, ou Carte Generale du Monde
Date: 1684
Published: Paris
Width: 23 inches / 59 cm
Height: 13 inches / 34 cm
Map ref: WLD4522
Description:
Beautiful double-hemisphere world map, first published by Pierre Duval in 1676. This example was reissued by Duval's daughter, Marie Angélique, in 1684 from a new copper-plate.

The map's geography was already slightly outdated when it was first issued in 1676: the shape of Australia, in particular, is quite old-fashioned. The large southern continent had also begun to disappear from some maps of the period, though it stubbornly remains on Duval's map. Typical for the period, the map shows California as an island following Sanson's model.

Above the map are two finely-engraved wind roses (one naming the winds at sea and one naming the winds in the Mediterranean) and an astronomical diagram depicting the geocentric model of the Solar System. In the lower corners are a globe and an armillary sphere.

Unusually, Marie Angélique Duval's imprint appears on the map itself in place of her father's, a real rarity for female mapmakers of this period. After Pierre Duval's death in 1683, the business passed to his widow and their two daughters, Marie-Angélique and Michelle. One or both of the daughters continued to publish maps until at least 1707 from Chez Mlle. Duval at their father's former address. Marie-Angélique Duval then married Guillaume De L'Isle, often considered the first scientific geographer, and one of France's great cartographers. After De L'Isle's death in 1726, Marie-Angélique again took over the business, publishing her late-husband's atlas until the firm could be passed to De L'Isle's nephew, Philippe Buache. One of the maps in the atlas, the map of Senegal and West Africa, bears the imprint 'La Veuve Delisle' (the widow Delisle), the only reminder of Marie-Angélique's extraordinary role in early French map publishing.

Original hand-colour. [Shirley (R.): The Mapping of the World, 522] [WLD4522]